You are here

LetsEncrypt

Letsencrypt: challenging challenges solved

A few weeks ago I was wondering in Letsencrypt: challenging challenges about how to setup Letsencrypt when a domain is spread across several virtual machines (VM). One of the possible solutions would be to consolidate everything on one single VM, which is nothing I would like to do. The second option would need to generate the Letsencrypt certs on the webserver and copy over the certs to the appropriate VM on a regular basis or event driven. The third option is to use a network share - and this is what I'm using right now.

So, my setup is as following after I solved the GlusterFS issue with rpcbind binding to all interfaces, although it has been configured to only listen to certain interfaces (solution was: simply remove all NFS related stuff):

On Dom0 (or the host machine) I run GlusterFS as a server on a small 1 GB LVM as part of a replicate with the VM that will do the actual Letsencrypt work: 

Volume Name: le
Type: Replicate
Status: Started
Number of Bricks: 1 x 2 = 2
Transport-type: tcp
Bricks:
Brick1: 192.168.x.254:/srv/gfs/le
Brick2: 192.168.x.1:/srv/gfs/le

This is to ensure that on reboot of the machine every other VM using Letsencrypt certs can mount the GlusterFS share, because the host machine will be there for sure whereas the other VM generating the certs with the letsencrypt.sh script might still be booting. And when the GlusterFS share is missing services will not start on the other VMs because of the missing certs, of course. So, the replica on the virtualization host (Dom0) is only acting as some kind of always-being-available network share, because, well, the other VM will not always be there... for example during a kernel update when a reboot is required.

The same setup is on my mailserver, acting as the second GlusterFS brick of that replica drive. The mailserver hosts the bind9 nameserver as well and I might do something that new domains with Letsencrypt certs get added to my DNSSEC setup as well. Of course, when the letsencrypt.sh script creates or updates the certs, it needs the certs being mounted in that configured location, so I needed to add a line to /etc/fstab: 

192.168.x.254:/le /etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs glusterfs noexec,nodev,_netdev 0 0

Basically the same needs to be done on the other VMs where you want to use the certs as well, but you may want to mount the share as read-only there.

The next step was a little more tricky. When letsencrypt.sh generates new certs, Letsencrypt will contact the webserver for that domain to respond to the ACME challenge. This requires that on each VM you want to use letsencrypt you have to run a webserver. Well, actually at least that there is somewhere a webserver that can answer these requests for that specific domain...

Now, the setup of the webserver (Apache in my case) is like this: 

I'm using the Apache macro module to make it more easy, so I generated two small configs in /etc/apache/conf-available and enabled them bei a2enconf: letsencrypt-proxy.conf to do some setup for proxying the ACME challenges to a common website called acme.example.org. And then letsencrypt-sslredir.conf to setup SSL redirection when everything is in place and the domain can be switched over to HTTPS-only.

letsencrypt-proxy.conf: 

<Macro le_proxy>
     ProxyRequests Off
     <Proxy *>
            Order deny,allow
            Allow from all
     </Proxy>
     ProxyPass /.well-known/acme-challenge/ http://acme.windfluechter.net/
     ProxyPassReverse / http://%{HTTP_HOST}/.well-known/acme-challenge/
</Macro>

letsencrypt-sslredir.conf:

<Macro le_sslredir>
    RewriteEngine on
    RewriteCond %{HTTPS} !=on
    RewriteRule . https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI}  [L]
</Macro>

So, after all the setup of a virtual host for Apache looks like this: 

<Macro example.org>
(lots of setup stuff)
</Macro>
<VirtualHost 31.172.31.x:443 [2a01:a700:4629:x::1]:443>
        Header always set Strict-Transport-Security "max-age=31556926; includeSubDomains"
        SSLEngine on
        # letsencrypt certs:
        SSLCertificateFile /etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs/example.org/fullchain.pem
        SSLCertificateKeyFile /etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs/example.org/privkey.pem
        SSLHonorCipherOrder On
    Use example.org
    Use le_proxy
</VirtualHost>
<VirtualHost 31.172.31.x:80 [2a01:a700:4629:x::1]:80>
    Use example.org
    Use le_proxy
    Use le_sslredir
</VirtualHost>

le_sslredir is only needed when you are sure that you want all traffic being redirected to HTTPS. For example when your blog is listed on planet.debian.org or other Planets you might want to omit this from your HTTP config because bug #813313 is not yet solved. 

In the end, when creating a new Letsencrypt cert, you need to add the le_proxy macro to your website, add the domain to letsencrypt.sh config in /etc/letsencrypt.sh/domains.txt and then the scripts will request a new cert from Letsencrypt, handling the ACME challenge stuff via the URL redirection in le_proxy being redirected to your acme.exmaple.org site and finally writes your new cert to the GlusterFS share. From that share you can then use the new cert on all needed VMs, be it your mailserver, webserver or XMPP/SIP server VMs. 

At least this works for me.

UPDATE:
Of course you should be careful about your file permissions on that GlusterFS share, so that the automatic key renewal works, but also without too many permissions granted that everyone can obtain your private keys.

Kategorie: 
 

Letsencrypt: challenging challenges

On December 3rd 2015 the Letsencrypt project went to public beta and this is a good thing! Having more and more websites running on good and valid SSL certificates for their HTTPS is a good thing, especially because Letsencrypt takes care of renewing the certs every now and then. But there are still some issues with Letsencrypt. Some people criticize the Python client needing root priviledges and such. Others complain that Letsencrypt currently only supports webservers.

Well, I think for a public beta this is what we could have expected from the start: the Letsencrypt project focussed on a reference implementation and there are already other implementations being available. But one thing seems to a problem within the design of how Letsencrypt works as it uses a challenge response method to verify that the requesting user is controlling the domain for which the certificate shall be issued. This might work well in simple deployments, but what about a little more complex setups like multiple virtual machines and different protocols involved.

For example: you're using domain A for your communication like user@example.net for your mail, XMPP and SIP. Your mailserver runs on one virtual machine, whereas the webserver is running on a different virtual machine. The same for XMPP and SIP: a seperate VM as well. 

Usually the Letsencrypt approach would be that you configure your webserver (by configure /.well-known/acme-challenge/* location or use a standalone server on port 443) to handle the challenge response requests. This would give you a SSL cert for your webserver example.net. Of course you could copy this cert to your mail-, XMPP- and SIP-server, but then again you have to do this everytime the SSL cert gets renewed.

Another challenge is of course that you are not only have one or two domains, but a bunch of domains. In my case I host approximately >60 domains. Basically the mail for all domains are handled by my mailserver running on its own virtual machine. The webserver is located on a different VM. For some domains I offer XMPP accounts on a third VM.

What is the best way to solve this problem? Moving everything to just one virtual machine? Naaah! Writing some scripts to copy the certs as needed? Not very smart as well. Using a network share for the certs between all VMs? Hmmm... would that work?

And what about TLSA entries of your DNSSEC setup? When a SSL cert is renewed than the fingerprint might need an update in your DNS zone - for several protocols like mail, XMPP, SIP and HTTPS. At least the Bash implementation of Letsencrypt offers a "hook" which is called after the SSL cert has been issued.

What are you ways to deal with this kind of handling the ACME protocol challenges and multi-domain, multi-VM setup?

Kategorie: 
 

Pages

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer